PROGRAMME DETAILS

Freestyle Versus Final Form

Freestyle Versus Final Form

Conversations

DATE / TIME

8 Nov, Sun 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
60mins

VENUE

SISTIC Live

Festival Pass Event

S$20

LANGUAGE

This session is in English

MODERATED BY

Yeow Kai Chai

DESCRIPTION

How does the age-old battle of form vs free verse play out in SEA? Can we decolonise poetry from typically Western forms? Are there forms and story structures that are traditionally SEAsian? Where is the line between preserving tradition and finding new ways to experiment with line, shape, and sound?

This is a pre-recorded session, and will be available on video-on-demand replay.

This programme is co-presented with Sing Lit Station.

FEATURING

So Phina

Cambodia

So is a writer and poet. With a background in Psychology and Social Work, she co-founded Slap Paka Khmer, an informal writers collective in Phnom Penh, as well as Kampu Mera Editions, a small press through which she and her peers have published three anthologies of short stories (predominantly by women writers), a historical novel, and two translations from French literature. She also founded the Khmer Literature Festival in 2017 that doubled in size and scope in 2018 and wrapped up another successful edition in 2019.

Photo Credit: SAY Tola

Mikael Johani

Indonesia

Mikael Johani is a poet, critic, and translator from Jakarta, Indonesia. His works have appeared in #UntitledThree (Edinburgh), On Relationships (London), Asymptote, The Johannesburg Review of Books, AJAR (Hanoi), Vice Indonesia, Kerja Tangan (Kuala Lumpur) and Popteori. He is the author of We Are Nowhere And It’s Wow (Post Press, 2017). His English translation of Gratiagusti Chananya Rompas’s poem, 'one by one the bodies died', won an Honourable Mention from the 2018 Hawker Prize for Southeast Asian Poetry. He organises Paviliun Puisi, a monthly open mic in Jakarta (currently on Zoom quarantine).

Mikael Johani is featured in the following SWF event(s):

Annaliza Bakri is an educator and translator. Her research interests include the interplay of ideology and ethnicity in shaping the dominant narratives in literature, language education, and the intersection between translation, history and humanity. Her writings have been published in Prairie Schooner, Brooklyn Rail, Budi Kritik (2019), and Centre for Stories. She edited and translated a poetry anthology titled Sikit-Sikit Lama-lama Jadi Bukit (2017) and recently translated award-winning poet Alvin Pang's What Gives Us Our Names (2011) into the Malay - Yang Menamakan Kita (2019).

Annaliza Bakri is featured in the following SWF event(s):

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